Malta's Most-Haunted Spots (or the ghosts of the Maltese islands)


 

Malta's Most Haunted Spots (or the Ghosts of Malta)

Halloween is right around the corner and we know some of you are die heart fans of the feast. While Malta’s Catholic spirit tends to keep the trick and treaters at bay, Malta has plenty of concealed secrets with regards to ghouls and spirits. Feed your thirst for sinistry with these 6 creepy local legends. 

1. Villa Sans Souci – Marsaxlokk

Constructed by Prof. Pisani in the 1870s, Villa Sans Souci is said to be haunted by a sense of dread. Pisani lived his days in Villa Sans Souci up until his passing, from a prolonged disease, in 1908. The villa was eventually sold by its heirs in 1940 to the Royal Air Force to serve as a base. Once the villa was abandoned, it became a target for vandals and thieves due to its prim architecture. Passers-by report hearing eerie noises being emitted from the villa during the day. 

Villa Sans Souci

2. Splendid Hotel – Valletta

Splendid Hotel has a quaint story attached to its walls. The hotel is located in Strait Street, a street which was the pinnacle of prostitution and crime back in the 19th century. The hotel closed its doors in the late 60s due to a grisly murder. A prostitute was found stabbed to death in one of the rooms’ bathrooms. The victim’s spirit is said to walk the empty hallways of the hotel, haunting curious explorers. Nowadays the space is used for art exhibitions by renowned names like Comic Con.

 

Splendid 👻 #malta #valletta #straitstreet #hotel #haunted #ghost

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3. Telgha t’Alla w’Ommu – Naxxar

If you’ve ever driven across the Maltese islands, you’ve probably passed through Telgha t’Alla w’Ommu on the way to your destination. Accidents are continuously reported in the ascent. The accidents are associated, by the superstitious, to the wandering spirits that haunt the hill - asking drivers for a lift. The spirits are credited to an undated hit and run that supposedly occurred on the very same hilltop.

4. Verdala Palace - Siġġiewi

The Verdala Palace is mostly renowned for being the President’s Summer residence, but the uncanny know the location for other purposes. The Palace is said to be haunted by the Blue Lady, a woman who supposedly plummeted to her death from a window in the Verdala Palace due to her imminent arranged wedding. The spirit of the woman is seen roaming the palace in the blue dress it perished in from time to time. Visitors of the palace have also reported experiencing supernatural trouble with the doors of the palace.

5. Manoel Theatre - Valletta

Manoel Theatre is the pride and joy of the Maltese and happens to be Europe’s third oldest functioning theatre. Actors, as well as audience members, have reportedly seen fog emerge from one of the seating boxes. Others have experienced slamming doors and drifting shadowed figures. The spirit is said to be called Rita - a beggar who inhabited the Manoel Theatre in the earlier days. It is said that Rita fell to her death from one of the theatre’s balconies as she fought to save her infant daughter from a stranger’s hands. 

6. Dar ix-Xjaten, Mellieħa

Dar ix-Xjaten was claimed to have been built by the devil in a day (or three - depending on who’s narrating the legend). The farmhouse initially served as a horse stable during the Knights’ ruling. The farmhouse is said to be the devil’s making due to its staircases creating the illusion of protruding horns. What’s creepier about the location is that classical music echoes from the house in the evening. The farmhouse is recognised to be a national monument by the Malta Environment and Planning Authority. 

The Devil's Farmhouse

Don’t let these legends scare you off, after all, they’re only superstitions...right? 😉 

Book your trip to Malta with Choice Holidays to ensure a thrilling stay! 

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